Posted in aba, antecedent based intervention, applied behavior analysis, asd, autism, behavior, behavior technician, Evidence Based Practice, pairing with reinforcement, parent training, positive reinforcement, rbt, rbt competency assessment, registered behavior technician, reinforcement, therapy

Parents Know Best

Parenting…it can be absolute bliss and also extremely overwhelming all at the same time. As a parent, one wears a lot of hats: caregiver, provider, chef, teacher, counselor, marriage partner, information specialist and more. This role grows tenfold with you’re a parent to a child with autism. Parents of children with autism must navigate a world that bombards them with information about what they should do to help their child succeed. You want to advocate for your child to get the best services and school programs available, but it’s hard to know where to start.

Parents know their children best. They know their passions, their strengths, and their stressors. Parents know that there are triggers to their child’s challenging behaviors that impede on the family’s ability to move smoothly through their daily lives. Although, sometimes it’s a struggle to figure out what exactly to do in order to stop the problem behaviors from happening. It’s easy to get stuck in a rut.

We’re quite certain we can help. We know how to empower you to make the right changes and improve the lives of your child and the family unit as a whole. ATCC Parent Training Series.

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), the highly researched ‘gold standard’ for autism treatment is a great place to start!

Becoming educated in ABA, will allow you to acquire knowledge to make desired behavior changes with your child. ABA will help you understand how your child learns, and we can show you how to use positive reinforcement strategies for continued learning and growth.

The World’s BEST ABA Training.

  • Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis
  • Teaching New Behavior
  • Teaching Communication
  • Teaching Social Skills
  • Teaching Self-Help Skills
  • Toilet Training
  • Reducing Challenging Behavior
  • Reducing Wandering
  • Reducing Tantrums
  • Reducing Eating Problems
  • Becoming an Adult with ASD 
  • And much more…

ATCC Parent Training Series

Posted in aba, applied behavior analysis, autism, Evidence Based Practice, parent training, registered behavior technician

Meet the Author

Katie Cook, MED, BCBA, is the Academic Director at ATCConline.com, an award-winning ABA training center. ATCC offers online RBT Certification, eLearning Caregiver Training, and Remote BCBA Supervision. ATCC just released its first ever Autism Parenting Program & Caregiver Community called Activities-in-Action.com – where fun and easy learning strategies and activities are shared through video demonstrations including access to needed materials and professional support. Activities-in-Action.com is the perfect compliment to the popular book, Thriving with Autism. 

KATIE COOK, MED, BCBA

In her personal time, there is nothing she loves more than spending quiet time at home with her beautiful German Shepherd, Nina. Her sisters, parents and all of her extended family have always been an important part of her life. Family parties and vacations are where you will find her during most weekends and holidays.

Katie Cook
Irvine, CA

Katie graduated with honors from California State University, Long Beach. Katie continued her education at National University, La Jolla, and earned her Master of Education with a Specialization in Autism. She later studied under Jose Martinez-Diaz, Ph.D., BCBA-D, associate dean, professor, and head of the School of Behavior Analysis at the Florida Institute of Technology. 

She has dedicated her professional career to building strategies that bring families into the therapeutic environment for children with autism. Education and Training are her passions and she believes these are the cornerstones of successful ABA programs.  She guided by her love for ABA and has spent years building both her ABA agency, ABA Services for Autism, and Autism Therapy Career College into wholehearted organizations, characterized by complete sincerity and commitment to their customers.

In 2020, Katie authored the book Thriving with Autism: 90 Activities to Encourage Your Child’s Communication, Engagement, and Play which outlines the details of fun ways to teach children though playful games and activities. Thriving with Autism: 90 Activities to Encourage Your Child’s Communication, Engagement, and Play is available for purchase on Amazon.

Lori Ayin, Laurie Tate, Katie Cook
Posted in aba, applied behavior analysis, asd, autism, behavior, EBP, education, Evidence Based Practice, parent training

eLearning Intro Video

Activities-in-Action.com

This awesome e-Learning program is designed for busy caregivers as it allows you to focus on one lesson per month. Each lesson introduces you to one evidence-based practice, including creative activities, video demonstrations, guided practices and tips to help you put your new skills to use right away!

Video Demonstrations
Free Materials/Resources
Caregiver Community

Posted in aba, antecedent based intervention, applied behavior analysis, autism, behavior, books, education, Evidence Based Practice, parent training, positive reinforcement, reinforcement, therapy, Uncategorized

30-Day Trial: NEW PRODUCT!

AS A PARENT OF CHILD WITH AUTISM, WHAT DO YOU NEED? For your child to reach his full potential — to achieve remarkable independence… to make friends, participate in the community and find joy. The solution is Activities-in-Action.com!

WHAT IS MISSING? NEEDED RESOURCES. Even in the U.S. where access to funding for ABA services is nearly ubiquitous and over 90.84% of the world’s 44,000 BCBAs reside, hundreds of thousands of parents are on waitlists to receive services. 

Posted in aba, antecedent based intervention, autism, behavior, books, discrete trial teaching, EBP, education, Evidence Based Practice, parent training, positive reinforcement, reinforcement, therapy

FREE Thriving with Autism eLearning

The 5-STAR Amazon reviewed, top-selling book, Thriving with Autism now has a supplementary Activities-in-Action eLearning program and we’re giving you access FREE for the first monthly lesson!

Don’t miss out on this amazing opportunity to learn evidence-based strategies for this unbeatable low price. Your first monthly lesson is FREE, while additional lessons are only $24 a month (no long-term commitment required).  

ATCC YouTube Channel

Katie Cook M.Ed. BCBA and Lori Ayin, M.Ed. RBT have put together a wholehearted program for caregivers of children with autism and related disorders, ages 1-11 years old, the most vital years of development. The Activities-in-Action program is equipped not only with a simple and easy to understand descriptions, but also video demonstrations and guided practices taught by certified professionals. 

Included with your FREE first month’s lesson is unlimited access to the Thriving with Parenting exclusive caregiver community where you can connect with other like-minded caregivers invested in their children’s learning and growth, as well as ask questions directly to certified professionals ready to ensure your success in this journey!

Posted in aba, antecedent based intervention, applied behavior analysis, asd, autism, behavior, behavior technician, books, career, career college, college, EBP, education, Evidence Based Practice, rbt, rbt training, registered behavior technician, reinforcement

Teaching Early Language – FREE Activity Guide

BUBBLES, BUBBLES, GLORIOUS BUBBLES (AGES 2 – 6)

ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION

Bubbles are a beloved toy for all, though they are particularly intriguing to young children with autism. What child wouldn’t relish in watching a liquid turn into seemingly magical, iridescent balls of floating air that disappear into the sky? So, you know you’ve got a captive audience when bubbles are around, this is the first crucial factor. 

What’s also great about bubbles is that they are the kind of toy that young children need assistance to play with. Unscrewing the container of bubbles and blowing a sustainable bubble are tasks that undoubtedly are difficult for a young child to do by themselves. This means they will need YOU to help them. Take full advantage of this by eliciting as much verbal and non-verbal language as you possibly can. 

Motivate your child to ask for more bubbles. Blow a few rounds of bubbles, then stop, leaving the wand in the container and see if you can your child to request for you to take the wand out. Then put the wand up to your mouth, but don’t blow. See if you can get your child to request you to blow. If your child is an early learner, you may accept him reaching for the container or wand as a way of communicating his wants, or maybe a simple first letter sound, such as ‘ba’ for ‘blow’ is developmentally appropriate for him.  For a child with more language ability, you can elicit the sentence “Please blow more bubbles”. 

MOTIVATION IS KEY!

Motivate your child to comment about bubble play. Demonstrate commenting during play, then stop and point at a bubble with an excited look on your face and see if your child will make a comment on their own. You can give an early learner a sentence to fill in, such as “That bubble is _____” or for a child with more language ability, help them to communicate longer, more descriptive sentences. 

To perform this activity all you will need is a container of bubbles and a bubble wand. Don’t fret if you don’t have bubbles on hand though, you can easily make your own with household items. All you need to do is mix 1-part dish soap to 3-parts water, add in a few teaspoons of sugar and stir it together. The sugar is a must, as it makes the bubbles last longer in the air. Wands can be made using anything with a hole in it such as pipe cleaners, drinking straws, and even a strainer.

Thriving with Autism: 90 Activities to Encourage Your Child’s Communication, Engagement, and Play

“Our mission is to make ABA strategies, evidence based practices, and therapy for children with autism available to everyone.”

Posted in aba, applied behavior analysis, autism, behavior, behavior technician, career, career college, competency assessment, discrete trial teaching, EBP, Evidence Based Practice, job search, jobs, online, online school, parent training, positive reinforcement, rbt, rbt competency assessment, rbt training, registered behavior technician, resume, school, study, Uncategorized

RBT FAQs

1. What is a Registered Behavior Technician (RBT)?
A Registered Behavior Technician is a certified Behavior Therapist. A Behavior Therapist typically provides 1:1 behavior intervention (ABA Therapy) to a child diagnosed with autism in the child’s home. Behavior Therapists also work in the school setting. Someone who is a Behavior Therapist and is certified with the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) is called a Registered Behavior Technician. This certification give the Behavior Therapist multiple advantages. An RBT typically has more job offers and is paid a higher salary than a non-certified Behavior Therapist. It is also much more rewarding to work as a certified Behavior Therapist (aka: RBT) because truly understanding the science of ABA makes helping clients much easier. It is a wonderfully rewarding feeling to have the knowledge and expertise to confidently do your job.

An RBT is a paraprofessional who practices under the close, ongoing supervision of a BCBA or BCaBA. A BCBA is a masters degree level professional certified in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). A BCaBA is a bachelors degree level professional certified in ABA.

2. How much does an RBT make? How much money is an RBT paid per hour?
According to Glassdoor, RBT salaries average $35,000/year and the RBT hourly wage ranges from $14 to $25 depending on experience.

3. How many RBT jobs are there?
There is a severe shortage of Behavior Therapists. Behavior Therapist is the most common term for the position held by a Registered Behavior Technician (RBT). Almost every single ABA company in the United States is hiring RBTs to work as Behavior Therapists. For example, if you search for ‘Behavior Therapist’ on Glassdoor, there are 13,859 job openings. If you search for ‘Behavior Therapist’ positions on Indeed, there are 15,652 job openings.

The diagnosis of autism is on the rise and the most effective therapy for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a ABA Therapy provided by a Behavior Therapist. There are thousands of children on waiting lists for ABA Therapy. Right now, there are more ABA companies opening than ever before in history. Virtually all of these new and growing ABA companies are hiring RBTs.

4. Who certifies Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs)?
The RBT certification is earned from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). (www.bacb.com)

5. How do I get the RBT certification from the BACB?
7 requirements must be fulfilled to get the RBT certification;
1. Be 18 years old.
2. Have a High School Diploma or equivalent.
3. Complete 40 hours of RBT training. Available here.
4. Pass a Competency Assessment with a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). This means you will demonstrate competency with 22 different ABA tasks. Many of these tasks will need to be demonstrated with a client.
5. Pass a Background check completed by a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA).
6. Fill out the application on the BACB website submitting documentation for all of the above.
7. Pass the RBT Multiple-Choice Examination at a Pearson Testing Center.

Only the ATCC Full RBT Credentialing Program offers ALL of these requirements in one place.

6. How much does it cost to become an RBT?
This depends on if you become an RBT with your employer or on your own. Some employers will pay for you to become an RBT after they hire you. Some people become RBTs on their own so they can get a job doing ABA therapy for the first time. In this case, you will need to find a company that provides the 40-hour RBT training & also find a BCBA who will complete both your Competency Assessment and Background Check. Many students choose to enroll in ATCC’s Full RBT Credentialing program because it includes ALL of the necessary requirements to become an RBT with BACB. See pricing information on the Full RBT Credentialing Program page.

7. How long does it take to become an RBT?
It is reasonable to plan on a 6-month process to become a fully certified RBT with the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). Although, it is possible to become an RBT in as little as just a few weeks, most students take 30-60 days to complete their 40-hour RBT curriculum, another month to complete their Competency Assessment / Background Check with a BCBA & during the final month successfully pass the Multiple-Choice Exam with the BACB.

8. What are the 3 biggest mistakes students make when trying to become an RBT?
Mistake 1: Taking a 40-hour RBT course from a company that does not offer the Competency Assessment and Background Check with a BCBA. Many RBT students find it very difficult (sometimes impossible) to find a BCBA who is available to provide their necessary Competency Assessment. For this reason, it is highly recommended that you secure a BCBA who will complete your Competency Assessment before starting a 40-hour RBT course with any organization. ATCC Full RBT Credentialing Program.

Mistake 2: When taking the 40-hour RBT course online, it is a mistake to multi-task and do other things while the videos are playing. Success with the highly technical science of ABA requires paying attention to the lessons and taking notes to study from later.

Mistake 3: Taking longer than 180 days to complete the 40-hour RBT training. The BACB has a requirement that the duration of the training must be at least 5 days but not more than 180 days. Taking longer than 180 days will invalidate the training.

Posted in aba, antecedent based intervention, applied behavior analysis, asd, autism, behavior, behavior technician, career, career college, EBP, Evidence Based Practice, online, online school, pairing, parent training, positive reinforcement, prompt, prompting, rbt, rbt competency assessment, rbt training, reinforcement, task analysis, Uncategorized

Move Into Action with Prompting

It’s the beginning of the school year and Johnny, a student with autism, is for the first time in an inclusive class setting. So far, he has integrated well into his 2ndgrade class, though there are still some skills that he needs assistance with. Luckily, he has you, his RBT, right there with him to ensure he inches closer and closer to achieving his goals! One of Johnny’s biggest hurdles in his new class is initiating a written task. Each day, the class is given a worksheet to complete independently. While his classmates complete their work, Johnny instead gets distracted by things in his environment and will not get started on his own.

Our job is to assist Johnny in achieving the skill of independently initiating a written task. How can we help him?

kid_doing_worksheet

We can use prompting, to help Johnny move into action!

In ABA, prompts are an essential part of teaching new skills. Prompts are specific and strategic types of assistance (help) given to a client in order to increase the likelihood of a correct response. For new skills, we want to start with the most intrusive prompts, and then reduce to less intrusive prompts as our learner achieves success.

Here’s how this may look for Johnny. All learners are different and therefore may start with a different level of prompts.

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Physical Prompt – Using physical contact to make sure a skill is demonstrated correctly. This may involve softly guiding Johnny hand-over-hand or simply moving his elbow forward prompting him to pick up his pencil and begin writing his name on the worksheet.

Verbal Prompt – Using only verbal instructions to bring about an accurate response. This may sound like “Johnny, get your pencil and begin your work” or simply “Get started”.

Gestural Prompt – Using a motion to cue the correct response. This may look like pointing to the pencil in order to get Johnny to pick it up and get started with his task.

Positional Prompt – Placing the necessary items in a location that elicits a correct response. This may involve placing his pencil and worksheet in view of Johnny’s eye level.

Visual Prompt – Using text or images to produce the correct response. You may make a visual image of the steps or write them in words for Johnny to reference depending on our learners reading level.

Don’t forget to positively reinforce Johnny’s successes; even when a prompt is used!

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The ultimate goal is for you to be able to fade the visual prompt out completely in the future, so there is no prompts needed for Johnny to independently initiate written tasks. In the chance that this doesn’t happen though, you can always return to a previous prompt or try to delay giving the visual prompt to see if Johnny moves closer to independence.

When implemented correctly, prompts are a very valuable tool to development independence for children with autism. In addition, prompting meets the evidence-based practice criteria with five single-subject design studies, demonstrating its effectiveness in the domains of academic and language/communication in all three age groups (i.e., preschool, elementary, middle/high school). See All.

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Posted in aba, antecedent based intervention, applied behavior analysis, asd, autism, behavior, behavior technician, career, career college, college, competency assessment, diagnosis, discrete trial teaching, EBP, education, Evidence Based Practice, job search, jobs, online, online school, positive reinforcement, rbt, rbt competency assessment, rbt training, registered behavior technician, therapy, verbal behavior

Why we love Dr. Temple Grandin

Dr. Temple Grandin is one of the most influential people in the world of Autism and if you’ve never heard of Dr. Temple Grandin, let me introduce you to her…

Dr. Temple Grandin is one of the most influential people in the world of Autism. Being that she has the diagnosis, she is able to speak easily about how her experiences living with Autism have affected her, explaining in detail why individuals with Autism behave the way they do and how to help them. Not only has she contributed tremendously in the field of Autism research and treatment, but she’s a professor of animal science. Dr. Temple Grandin has fought tirelessly to improve the treatment of livestock on cattle ranches, including inventing animal handling systems intended to ease the fear and pain of animals in meat packing plants.

For all the incredible work that she does, Dr. Temple Grandin has received numerous rewards and honors over the years.

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In September 2017 she earned another well deserved notch on her cowgirl belt and it’s a big one! Dr. Temple Grandin was one of September 2017’s inductees into the National Women’s Hall of Fame, an honor given to other remarkable women such as Eleanor Roosevelt and Rosa Parks.

Dr. Temple Grandin has helped the world see the potential children with Autism have to be productive citizens and do great things with their lives, and she believes a well-structured ABA therapy program can help in making these achievements possible. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to be a part of the Autism Therapy field which contributes so greatly to changing the lives of children with Autism?

Autism Therapy Career College can make it happen!

Posted in aba, antecedent based intervention, applied behavior analysis, asd, autism, behavior, behavior technician, career, career college, Christopher Duffley, college, competency assessment, cover letter, diagnosis, discrete trial teaching, EBP, education, Evidence Based Practice, job search, jobs, online, online school, pairing, rbt, rbt competency assessment, rbt training, registered behavior technician, Uncategorized

$29 RBT Training

If you believe in yourself and have dedication and pride – and never quit, you’ll be a winner. The price of victory is high but so are the rewards.” Paul Bryant

We understand the incredible need for Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) in the field of ABA therapy for children with autism. In fact, there are children on waiting lists to receive therapy at almost every ABA agency.

We urge you to begin working towards your RBT credential and start your career in this amazing field.  ATCC now offers multiple programs to meet the needs of each and every learner.

Do you already have experience in the field of ABA and just need the 40-Hour Registered Behavior Technician (RBT) curriculum? Awesome, you can enroll for just $29! Enroll in the ATCC RBT course and get your 40-hour curriculum done easily and quickly. 

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Are you joining the field for the very first time and need help through the entire RBT credentialing process? Enroll in one of our comprehensive Autism Therapy Programs. These are offered both On-Campus and Online.

Take the 40-hour RBT Curriculum  for $29 and build your skills to educate, enrich and inspire the lives of children diagnosed with autism. Or let Autism Therapy Career College lead your though each step of the entire RBT credential in one of our comprehensive Autism Therapy Programs. Either way your are on the path to your rewarding future career!

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